LIST: My 10 Favorite Albums of 2016

After posting my favorite songs of 2016, I’m now ready to unveil my 10 favorite albums from this unbelievably great year in new music. For your reference, here are my favorite albums lists from 2011, 2012, 20132014 and 2015.

Before I get to the long-form thoughts on the 10 best albums I heard this year, here are albums 20 through 11 on my list, accompanied by one song from each.

20. Wild Nothing – Life on Pause (“To Know You”)

19. Cullen Omori – New Misery (“No Big Deal”)

18. Kendrick Lamar – untitled unmastered. (“untitled 03 | 05.28.2013”)

17. Chance the Rapper – Coloring Book (“All Night”)

16. Bon Iver – 22, A Million (“22 OVER S∞∞N”)

15. Lucy Dacus – No Burden (“I Don’t Wanna Be Funny Anymore”)

14. Sunflower Bean – Human Ceremony (“Come On”)

13. David Bowie – Blackstar (“Lazarus”)

12. Radiohead – A Moon Shaped Pool (“Burn the Witch”)

11. Solange – A Seat at the Table (“Don’t Touch My Hair”)

Here they are, my 10 favorite albums of 2016.

local10. Local Natives – Sunlit Youth

Local Natives are the hardest-working band in the game these days. They tour constantly and all throughout the world. They did take a short break after finishing touring their second album, Hummingbird, but this year they returned with Sunlit Youth, which represented a departure from the more conventional sound of their first two records. They’ve gone in a slightly more electronic direction here, but the results are still outstanding. It starts with the synth-driven excellence of “Villainy” and then the best song here, “Past Lives”. Lyrically, Sunlit Youth is pretty political, with the already-dated “I have waited so long, Mrs. President” line in the frantic “Fountain of Youth” and the never-dated defense of feminism in “Masters”, an all-out rocker reminiscent of their best song, 2010’s “Wide Eyes”. The one song here that sounds generally like a classic Local Natives song is “Dark Days” which improbably features guest vocals from the lead singer of the Cardigans (remember them?). I always give bands extra points for trying new things, and the Natives deserve many for going down a bold new path with Sunlit Youth. I should mention here that I’ve had the chance to hang out with the guys in Local Natives a few times, including recently when they came to Providence and Boston, and I can’t say enough about how nice and generous they are to their fans. That makes their success all the more enjoyable.

parquet9. Parquet Courts – Human Performance

These four Brooklyn dudes have come a long way in just a few years. Human Performance is Parquet Courts’ third full-length record and with each record they’ve progressed from their punkish roots to a well-rounded indie rock band. Without a doubt, Human Performance is their best effort to date, leaving behind some of their screamy and atonal vibes for a truly cohesive work making ample use of melody and different sounds beyond the thrash of Light Up Gold and Sunbathing Animal. From the jump, there’s a different feel. “Dust” is a more organized, straightforward opener with a really strong guitar line. The title track comes next, with lead singer Andrew Savage’s echoed choruses adding something dramatic to the tune about a breakup: “It never leaves me / Just visits less often.” I love the spaghetti western feel of “Berlin Got Blurry”, which really feels like a song to listen to on a long road trip. On the lengthy, winding road of “One Man No City” Austin Brown takes over lead vocals, seemingly focusing on the end of the world over bongo beats before the band jumps into a Velvet Underground-inspired maelstrom of guitar and drums. There is really no telling how high Parquet Courts will fly now that they’ve discovered this new polish to their sound. With Human Performance, there is no longer a ceiling on what they can be.

freetown8. Blood Orange – Freetown Sound

I was a bit late to Dev Hynes’ previous album as Blood Orange, Cupid Deluxe, but was nonetheless enraptured by his ability write meaningful, soulful and funky R&B. These songs were deeply sexy but also brilliant examples of the form, textured with scintillating, jazzy beats, Nile Rodgers-like guitar work and vocals from Hynes and a variety of guests. Hynes keeps the beat going on Freetown Sound, another phenomenal exploration of all things R&B. There’ve been many excellent albums the last few years by black artists taking a focus on what it means to be black in today’s world, including Black Messiah, To Pimp a Butterfly and A Seat at the Table, and Freetown Sound joins that cadre with Hynes’ own experience as both a black man and an immigrant (he’s British and lives in Brooklyn). “All we ever wanted was a chance for ourselves,” he sings on “Chance.” Later, on the topically-titled “Hands Up”, Hynes describes the anxieties of the day for so many (“Are you sleeping with the lights on baby?”) Elsewhere, Hynes takes a backseat vocally to Empress Of on “Best to You”, a very different kind of love song but one that showcases her measured singing over a frenetic beat. There’s still time for fun on Freetown Sound outside the heaviness of subject matter, and that’s best heard on “E.V.P.”, which is far and away my favorite Blood Orange song to date. To say “E.V.P.” has a killer groove would be the understatement of 2016, a groove befitting the guest appearance here by new wave goddess Debbie Harry. Freetown Sound is an impressive collection from an impressive artist who continues to rise.

diiv7. DIIV – Is the Is Are

Zachary Cole Smith, the leader of melodic Brooklynites DIIV, has some issues. He’s been arrested for heroin violations, has various health problems, and pretty much every time I’ve seen DIIV in concert he’s acted like a dick. This year he introduced each song by name and then quickly said “We’re called DIIV!” before launching into them, asked people in the crowd for drugs and accused us of being boring and depressing. This isn’t exactly a great way to endear yourself to fans. But, musically, DIIV have ever been better than this year’s Is the Is Are, their sophomore LP. Smith is the dominant creative force here, and I appreciate someone with demons who isn’t afraid to confront them in their art. The ringing guitar work on Is the Is Are is perhaps its defining trait musically, with outstanding sounds on the gorgeous “Loose Ends” and the shimmering “Healthy Moon”. On “Dopamine”, Smith and company spin a bright melody while he sings candidly about fighting drugs. (“Would you give your 34th year / For a glimpse of heaven / Now and here?”) DIIV’s best track here, and probably their best to date, is the beautiful “Under the Sun”, which Smith said was about how love saved him. The melodious guitar riffs recall the late-’80s wonder of the Cure as Smith sings “Yes I’ll come back to you / No I won’t ask where you run / Under the sun” to his girlfriend, pop songstress Sky Ferreria. As a person, I hope Smith continues to heal himself and get better. I’d like to think Is the Is Are is a step in the right direction personally while also being the best step DIIV has taken creatively.

blond6. Frank Ocean – Blonde

I adored Frank Ocean’s 2012 solo breakthrough Channel Orange. It was a lengthy treatise on the world Ocean saw, and it helped bring me back to R&B after years on the sidelines. The world waited over four years to hear something significant from Frank again. After several false starts, he finally released a visual album, Endless, and an audio album, Blonde (although he wrote it as blond on the record, which sounds about right for Frank’s style). While I could care less about the former album, the latter didn’t disappoint. Blonde is a portrait of an artist at a crossroads. Frank very easily could have made a 40-minute record with songs like “Pyramids” or “Thinkin Bout You” (the most conventional song on Blonde is “Pink + White”, which also happens to be the best song here). Instead he followed his muse and created an hour-long journey populated with diverse detours, some of which even push the boundaries of what qualifies as a song. Some of these songs are insanely sparse, only accompanied by one or two instruments. But what fills in the gaps are Frank’s otherworldly vocals. He’s seriously the best male singer in pop music and his voice carries otherwise spare tunes like “Solo”, “Self Control”, “Ivy”, and “White Ferrari”. On the incredible harmonic outro of “Self Control”, a bazillion Franks sing achingly about a lost love. Blonde is an intense journey and shows how separate and unique Frank’s many talents are. This was worth the wait, and if we get more records like Blonde, he can take as much time as he wants between releases.

tlop5. Kanye West – The Life of Pablo

This album is a mess. The Life of Pablo seemed to take forever to complete, went through several name changes, has songs that seem like half-finished thoughts, and once it finally was released in the early morning hours of a bitterly cold Valentine’s Day, Kanye West couldn’t help himself and tinkered with the damn thing over and over. Despite all those problems, and despite being an aforementioned mess, The Life of Pablo is a beautiful, exciting mess, and rightfully in Kanye’s pantheon of great accomplishments. Musically, TLOP is on par with anything he’s ever done. Like Blonde, there is often sparse instrumentation but Kanye is brilliant at picking and choosing his spots. Here’s an artist trying new things, pushing his boundaries as a writer, composer and producer while challenging us to push our own as listeners. The biggest problem with TLOP, however is…Kanye. The dude just can’t help himself. The music and beats are beyond superb on tracks like “Father Stretch My Hands”, “Famous”, “Feedback”, “Highlights” and “Waves” but they’re all brought down a notch by his borderline-juvenile rantings about such things as wishing he could affix a GoPro to his penis and hoping he still has a chance to fuck Taylor Swift. The biggest exception to this is the haunting, excruciatingly personal “Real Friends”, his most naked song in years. The best Kanye is vulnerable Kanye, and on “Real Friends” that’s his default mode. Other highlights include the explosive duet with Kendrick Lamar “No More Parties in LA” and the heavily spoken-word, written-in-the-moment jam of “30 Hours”. I’ve resigned myself to the fact Kanye will never again eclipse what he did on 2010’s My Beautiful Dark Twisted Fantasy. But Kanye at 80 percent of his capabilities is better than almost every other artist on the planet, and that’s what we got on TLOP.

jew4. Jimmy Eat World – Integrity Blues

I wrote about what Jimmy Eat World means to me when Damage made my 2013 end-of-year list. To sum up: Jimmy Eat World is my favorite band of the last 15 years and I’ve marked the changing seasons of my life alongside their music. Dating back to Futures in 2004, however, even I’d argue the quality of their music has declined with each album. Every now and then a song like “Carry You” or “Stop” would emerge and remind me of their greatness. But they hadn’t really done it over the course of a whole album a long time. The wait is over. Integrity Blues is Jimmy Eat World’s best album since Futures, and I’m still leaving open the possibility it’s better than Futures (I may need 12 more years to determine that, however). The quality of the songwriting and music are amazing here, the vast majority hitting their signature sound with lyrical content focusing on heartbreak and picking up the pieces. Opener “You With Me” is an absolute revelation, a smashingly successful, huge-sounding table-setter. My favorite song of 2016 was album centerpiece “Sure and Certain”, a classic Jimmy Eat World song in the vein of all their best hits both musically and lyrically. The melodic beauty of “You Are Free” would fit on album they’ve ever done and features typically out-of-this-world drumming from Zach Lind. I love the bouncy guitar sound on “Through”, the quiet innovation of the title track, and the epicness of their traditional epic closer “Pol Roger.” There’s even some room for hard rock: the bone-crushing guitar outro of “Pass the Baby” is possibly the hardest these guys have ever rocked. I do wonder how much more music we’ll hear from Jimmy Eat World, as Jim Adkins said the guys asked themselves why they’d make another record before doing this one. I’d hope the experience of making Integrity Blues reinvigorated Jimmy Eat World. It has certainly reinvigorated longtime fans like me.

pinegrove3. Pinegrove – Cardinal

Imagine, for a moment, this alternative musical universe: after the mid-’90s dissolution of Uncle Tupelo, Jeff Tweedy links up with Jimmy Eat World and starts a new band (Jimmy Eat Wilco?) that plays country-tinged pop punk. That’s roughly the sound I would ascribe to Pinegrove, who this year dropped their major label debut Cardinal. It’s a simple comparison, but Pinegrove deserve credit for sculpting a sound all their own in 2016. You’re just as likely to hear eardrum-rattling post-punk power chords on Cardinal as you are light touches of banjo and mandolin. In total, this quick half-hour is the most full-of-life and carpe diem-eqsue collection of songs I came across this year. Their sounds aren’t reminiscent, but Cardinal reminds me a great deal of Japandroids’ Celebration Rock: a record you can pump your fist to while taking on the world. And similar to Celebration Rock, Cardinal focuses more on the intimacy of friendships than romantic love. This is highly apparent in the album bookends of “Old Friends” at the outset and “New Friends” at the end. The latter reminds me of what it was like going off to college with that uneasy confidence you experience as a teenager. “I resolve to make new friends,” sings Evan Stephens Hall. “I liked my old ones / But I fucked up, so I’ll start again.” Hall’s voice warbles with emotion from the outset of the record, a voice feeling familiar yet distant. “Every outcome’s such a comedown,” Hall yelps on “Old Friends,” while later managing to include the word “solipsistic” in a rock song. “Then Again” bursts at the seams with energy and every kind of guitar shit-kicking riff you can imagine; “Aphasia” and “Visiting” are awesome explorations of Hall trying to find that confidence to be the person he wants to be; “Size of the Moon” is the thoughtful, building, dramatic penultimate marvel that hints at years of future success for these kids. In a year so difficult for so many, I’d imagine Cardinal provided a shot of life at the right time. And if you need it as 2016 comes to an end, I’d suggest giving Pinegrove a chance.

whitney2. Whitney – Light Upon the Lake

Two years ago, when Smith Westerns called it quits after just three albums, I worried the uber-talented Chicago kids wouldn’t find individual success. I’m happy to report those worries were unfounded. While frontman Cullen Omori put out a mostly-terrific yet overly-slick solo debut in March, lead guitarist Max Kakaceck and drummer Julian Ehrlich released their debut album as Whitney in June. With Light Upon the Lake, Ehrlich (who mans the vocals as well as the drums for Whitney) and Kakaceck have blazed their own trail in ‘60s-influenced guitar rock. While the soft touches of Smith Westerns remain in much of what’s here, it’s actually Ehrlich’s other previous band, Unknown Mortal Orchestra, that provides most of the influence over the sound, feel and production of Light Upon the Lake. UMO has this incredible knack of making their records sound like they were actually recorded in 1968, and that’s a trick Whitney picked up, especially on the UMO-flavored short rocker “The Falls”. The filter on Ehrlich’s voice throughout the record also has this effect as well, a honey-flavored tone that teeters on falsetto from time to time, showcased on the horn-powered “Polly”, bouncy closer “Follow” and the crisp, string-backed opener “No Woman”. (Side note: when I saw Whitney this year, Ehrlich said “No Woman” was about not having a girlfriend and he seemed pretty down about it. Poor Julian…) My favorite song here is the acoustic-driven “Golden Days”, a lament for lost love that sounds huge with its singalong “na na nas” but maintains a simple beauty. And, overall, despite most of the songs being about the end of relationships, Light Upon the Lake has an unmistakable air of fun. This is no better found than on “No Matter Where We Go”, a rollicking and sweet song brimming with bright riffs and this whimsical chorus: “I can take you out / I wanna drive around / With you with the windows down / And we can run all night.” Smith Westerns may be dead, but Kakaceck and Ehrlich are soldiering on, brightly into the future, with Whitney as their vehicle for psychedelic wonderment.

cshr1. Car Seat Headrest – Teens of Denial

In so many ways, 2016 was a disaster. But for new music, it simply was not. Most of our remaining pop/rock stars put out new material: Kanye West, Frank Ocean, Beyonce, Drake, the Weeknd, Radiohead, Justin Timberlake, Rihanna, Kendrick Lamar, David Bowie. Several of my own favorite bands brought new tunes. And from newer artists, the volume of outstanding work was dizzying. In all, 2016 was quite possibly the best year of new music I’ve experienced in my 30 years. Yet with all that, the album standing above all others was the major-label debut of a lo-fi indie rock band with a stupid name led by a heretofore unknown Virginian millennial. Car Seat Headrest’s Teens of Denial is the best rock album not named Lost in the Dream released this decade. Will Toledo’s band crafted 12 incredible songs touching a wide range of influences: the mostly-understated and occasionally-wild vocal style of Stephen Malkmus, the melodic guitar of the Strokes, the soft/loud dynamics of the Pixies and thoughtful lyrical overtures in the long line of Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen, Jeff Tweedy and, more recently, Courtney Barnett. Toledo isn’t treading a ton of new ground here: he’s just perfecting it and coming across like a savvy veteran doing it. Teens of Denial has killer guitar work, like the klaxon call of opener “Fill in the Blank”, the bone-crushing power chords of “Destroyed by Hippie Powers” and “1937 State Park”, and the start/stop chops of “Unforgiving Girl (She’s Not An)”. But there’s room for more: “Drugs With Friends” sounds like a wayward Wilco song with Toledo lamenting that “I did not transcend / I felt like a walking piece of shit” after taking drugs. “Drunk Drivers/Killer Whales” is one of the best rock songs in years, hitting that loud/soft dynamic while Toledo sings starkly about his inner demons. And there are even epics like the 11.5-minute marvel “The Ballad of the Costa Concordia” and “Cosmic Hero” which starts with plaintive horns and ends with wailing guitars and drums as Toledo screams: “I will go to heaven! / You won’t go to heaven! / I won’t see you there!” It’s the sound of a rock outfit leading the charge of a new generation, planting a flag in uncertain times. My three favorite albums this year are by young bands making either their major-label or full-length debuts. As difficult as 2016 was, bands like Car Seat Headrest give us one thing: hope. And man, do we need it.

LIST: My Favorite Songs of 2014 So Far

It’s July 1, so that means it’s time for my list of my favorite songs of the year as we hit the midway point. It’s been a great year so far, with more and more artists old and new making an impact. These 10 songs have caught my attention the most of all. Here they are in alphabetical order by artist. Enjoy.

THE BLACK KEYS – “GOTTA GET AWAY”

The new album from Black Keys, who quickly became one of the biggest bands in the world after nearly a decade of obscurity, is a letdown. Bands are entitled to clunkers every now and then and I hope Turn Blue, which is overpopulated with mid-tempo rockers reminiscent of recent Kings of Leon albums, is just a bump in the road for this immensely well-regarded duo. There are a few bright spots, none brighter than closer “Gotta Get Away.” The three-minute rocker has an air of summer kick-assery that arrived just in time for warm weather this year. It’s definitely a roll-down-the-windows-and-shout-the-lyrics-whilst-not-caring-if-anyone-sees kind of jam. Dan Auerbach sings about getting the hell away from a bad lover over terrific licks and throwback Hammond organ tones. If only the rest of Turn Blue was half as awesome as “Gotta Get Away.”

BOMBAY BICYCLE CLUB – “LUNA”

I appreciate bands willing to take a chance. Sometimes it works, sometimes it fails. For Bombay Bicycle Club, whose critical breakout A Different Kind of Fix is undoubtedly one of my favorite albums of the last five years, they took their indie rock stylings in a direction that included sampling, electronica and world music on So Long, See You Tomorrow. Lead singer Jack Steadman, taking the controls for the first time as producer, did masterful work especially on the album’s standout track “Luna.” With tribal rhythms, voices from around the world, an outstanding bass line by Ed Nash, and a general sense of adventure, “Luna” is the London band’s most ambitious and daring indie-pop effort to date and they succeed with flying colors. A great song can make you feel like you’re going on a journey, and I’m ecstatic these guys took a chance on the journey of “Luna.”

CYMBALS – “EROSION”

During a year that saw new music from the likes of the National, Vampire Weekend, Arcade Fire, My Bloody Valentine, Arctic Monkeys and so many others, my favorite song of the year came from a little-known London band called CYMBALS who produced the awesomely-gripping dance rocker “The Natural World.” They followed up that gem with an album full of excellent songs on The Age of Fracture. The best of the non-“Natural World” bunch is “Erosion,” a sprawling wonder tying together many of CYMBALS’ most obvious influences, including ‘80s-era sounds from the Cure, New Order and Depeche Mode. The lyrics from Jack Cleverly (what a great name) present the speaker as a metaphorical ocean, eroding away the bad feelings from a failed relationship. “I’m getting over this thing,” he signs, while the synths and high-pitched guitars squeal behind his Robert Smith-intoned vocals.

DUM DUM GIRLS – “ARE YOU OKAY?”

Behind the velvety soft voice, poignant lyrics and accessible guitar strums of lead singer Dee Dee, Dum Dum Girls are a personal favorite of mine among unheralded indie rock bands. Each of their recent releases has contained at least one song I couldn’t listen to enough and they continued that trend in 2014. On Too True, the Girls took a more poppy turn and released my favorite pop-rock song of the year so far in album centerpiece “Are You Okay?” Dee Dee channels the artistic pathos and feel of Tom Petty at his most laid-back here. Many different popular ’80s and ‘90s musical styles have returned to vogue recently, but I can’t recall any other band taking on one of that era’s most successful rock songsters in Petty. Dee Dee goes for it and the results are beyond worthy.

EAGULLS – “TOUGH LUCK”

If you haven’t heard much from the cleverly-named Eagulls (no Don Henley need apply, thankfully) to this point, you probably will. That’s not because they’re going to be hugely popular. They’re just really, really, loud. The lads from Leeds who all look so different that I highly doubt they hang out together much offstage are taking the post-punk indie rock world by storm with a sound that combines early Cure at their most hardcore and the Clash at their most angry. “Tough Luck” is my favorite track from their self-titled debut, jamming along at a breakneck pace while lead singer George Mitchell (not THAT George Mitchell) doesn’t sing as much as he shouts the lyrics. I love the 80s-ish guitar fills throughout that sound like they were doused with Aquanet. I don’t know what the future will hold for Eagulls. I just know it will probably involve earplugs.

JACK WHITE – “LAZARETTO”

Jack White is settling nicely into the fourth act of his fantastic career as one of modern rock’s preeminent visionaries. Following his legendary run in the White Stripes and side dalliances with the Raconteurs and the Dead Weather, White is finally just himself and doing a great job differentiating his solo work from his previous incarnations. That continues on Lazaretto, with the title track lead single standing out strongest to me. Here we get White exploring a great groove and getting downright funky in spots, something we haven’t heard much from him through the years. With fuzzy guitar riffs and a piercing solo, drumming Meg White could never pull off, utilizing rare synthesizers (for White) and even tossing in an out-of-nowhere fiddle solo, Jack White blazes a new, fun trail with the best parts of “Lazaretto.” Sometimes fourth acts can surprise you.

THE PAINS OF BEING PURE AT HEART – “BEAUTIFUL YOU”

The Pains of Being Pure at Heart returned in April with a revamped lineup and their first new album in three years, Days of Abandon. Each of their three albums carries a different tenor of indie pop wonderfulness from leader Kip Berman and while Days of Abandon has plenty of the sugary 90s-infused clean-guitar rock heard on 2011’s Belong, the band really hits its stride on several softer tunes this time around. My favorite is the longingly amazing “Beautiful You.” Berman has clearly grown up some with his lyrics, imploring his subject in this song that maybe they aren’t as young as they think they are. But there’s still room for falling in love. “So far from me / Still all I need / Is you / Beautiful you,” he sings over that perfect little riff that runs through the song. Call me a softy, but these guys can sure write a great song.

REAL ESTATE – “CRIME”

One of the most unassailable bands going today are New Jersey jangle-rock masters Real Estate. Creative forces Martin Courtney, Mark Mondanile and Alex Bleeker are the core of a band that will surprise you with their chops and wow you with their sounds. They’ve reached their highest peak as a band on this year’s Atlas, with “Crime” possibly their the best song to date. Everything works here with such fluidity and harmony, between Courtney’s clean chords, Mondanile’s tender arpeggios, the perfectly sparse rhythm section and a guitar solo befitting its chill nature. It reminds me of an island in the sun and being “so drunk” in the August sun as well. “I remember when / This all felt like pretend,” Courtney coos midway through. A song this outstanding can sometimes feel like pretend. But this time, as Courtney once sang in one of Real Estate’s past greats, it’s real.

ST. VINCENT – “REGRET”

Annie Clark probably doesn’t get as much attention as she deserves. Four albums into her career under the moniker St. Vincent, Clark keeps progressing as an eclectic virtuoso who learned at the feet of Sufjan Stevens, the Polyphonic Spree and David Byrne. Seeing her touring with Byrne a few years ago was a revelation, stealing the attention with her performing, singing and guitar-playing. Her eponymous fourth album contains several strong rockers, none better than “Regret,” which draws from her Byrne/Bowie influences. There are heavenly choruses, with acoustic guitars sounding like harps. There are heavily distorted guitar riff breaks that feel like jagged edges amongst the beauty. And then there is the voice, one of the best going in rock right now, switching between dirty and clean sounds, carrying the day. “Regret” hopefully will contribute to Clark’s emergence from indie darling to mainstream force.

THE WAR ON DRUGS – “BURNING”

Choosing one song from the War on Drugs’ newest album, Lost in the Dream, for this list was tough. I reserve the right to change my mind on what will make my year-end list, because at least half the songs were worthy from this phenomenal album where leader Adam Granduciel culls the finest ‘80s work of Bruce Springsteen and Bob Dylan. I chose “Burning” for its grandeur, its ambition and its success. It’s in a perfect spot on the album, just before the closers and opens with building synth notes before exploding in a maelstrom of ‘80s-rock tinged euphoria. Amidst the triumph is despair. During the second verse, he wails “When you release me from your heart again / I’m just a burning man, trying to keep the ship / From turning over again.” Granduciel is a broken hero on a last chance power drive and while the highway may be jammed with many other similarly talented artists, “Burning” helps him, his band and this great album stand out.